Re: Responsible Use of Force

Posted: May 28, 2013 by patrickasay in Uncategorized

It definitely is interesting that there is no universal certification method for holding a “black belt” in a martial art style.  It depends on the style, the instructor, the organization, etc.  For example, I know of Taekwondo schools that get you to black belt in 3-4 years.  Brazilian Jiujitsu takes closer to 10 years.  

 

Anyway, back to the “effective” piece.  As a black belt in Kung Fu, Taekwondo, and Uchudo (2nd Dan),  I can confidently say that in many (not all! I’m still learning) aspects of fighting I am very effective.  Boastful? I think not.  A true martial artist should have the confidence that what they have learned they can apply with effectiveness.  

 

Now on to the “responsible Use of Force.”  The reason Applied Martial Arts teaches primarily Jiujitsu, joint locks, submissions, and weapons disarms from white belt to green belt (the color after white) is because it is much more peaceful than punching someone to a bloody pulp.  

 

If someone comes after me with a knife, and I am unarmed, and attacks me I will use a disarm technique, apply some sort of submission, and call the police.  When the police come I will be able to explain what I did, how I did it, and why.  And that is more “responsible” than pulling out my glock and shooting him.  In that case I could face prison time.

 

For me, the point of being a martial artist is to be able to defeat an attacker with a clear advantage (weight, height, multiple attackers, weapons, etc.) using the least amount of force necessary, as Brock mentioned.

 

Good post, Brock!

 

Patrick Asay

 

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Comments
  1. You know, I think this is one of those subjects almost all martial artists agree on, but not nearly as many actually practice. Unless you’re a student of Cobra Kai Dojo (Karate Kid reference!), you’d probably say you use the least amount of force necessary, but how many people actually train those less assaultive techniques regularly or train those lower threat scenarios?

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